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Amps to Watts Calculator FullScreen

Convert electrical current in amperes (A) to power in watts (W). Ideal for understanding power consumption and electrical load calculations. Obtain an estimation of watts from amperes using this practical online tool.

W
kW
mW

* Use e for scientific notation. E.g: 5e3, 4e-8, 1.45e12



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What is Amps to Watts Calculator

Converting amps (A) to watts (W) requires knowledge of the voltage (V) at which the electrical device operates. The formula for converting amps to watts is:

Watts (W) = Amps (A) x Volts (V)

To use this formula, you need to know the amperage (A) and the voltage (V) at which the device is operating.

For example, if you have a device that operates at 10 amps and 120 volts, you can calculate the power consumption in watts as follows:

Watts (W) = 10 A x 120 V Watts (W) = 1200 W

In this example, the device consumes 1200 watts of power.

Please note that this calculation assumes a direct current (DC) system. If you are working with an alternating current (AC) system, additional factors such as power factor may need to be considered for a more accurate conversion. Additionally, it's important to ensure that the load being measured is purely resistive, as different types of loads may have different power factors and efficiencies.

DC amps to watts calculation

The power P in watts (W) is equal to the current I in amps (A), times the voltage V in volts (V):

P(W) = I(A) × V(V)

AC single phase amps to watts calculation

The power P in watts (W) is equal to the power factor PF times the phase current I in amps (A), times the RMS voltage V in volts (V):

P(W) = PF × I(A) × V(V)

AC three phase amps to watts calculation

Calculation with line to line voltage

The power P in watts (W) is equal to square root of 3 times the power factor PF times the phase current I in amps (A), times the line to line RMS voltage VL-L in volts (V):

P(W) = 3 × PF × I(A) × VL-L(V)

Calculation with line to neutral voltage

The power P in watts (W) is equal to 3 times the power factor PF times the phase current I in amps (A), times the line to neutral RMS voltage VL-N in volts (V):

P(W) = 3 × PF × I(A) × VL-N(V)

Typical power factor values

Do not use typical power factor values for accurate calculations.

Device Typical power factor
Resistive load 1
Fluorescent lamp 0.95
Incandescent lamp 1
Induction motor full load 0.85
Induction motor no load 0.35
Resistive oven 1
Synchronous motor 0.9

Amps to watts table (120V)

Current (A) Voltage (V) Power (W)
0.1 amps 120 volts 12 watts
0.2 amps 120 volts 24 watts
0.3 amps 120 volts 36 watts
0.4 amps 120 volts 48 watts
0.5 amps 120 volts 60 watts
0.6 amps 120 volts 72 watts
0.7 amps 120 volts 84 watts
0.8 amps 120 volts 96 watts
0.9 amps 120 volts 108 watts
1 amps 120 volts 120 watts
2 amps 120 volts 240 watts
3 amps 120 volts 360 watts
4 amps 120 volts 480 watts
5 amps 120 volts 600 watts
6 amps 120 volts 720 watts
7 amps 120 volts 840 watts
8 amps 120 volts 960 watts
9 amps 120 volts 1080 watts
10 amps 120 volts 1200 watts

Amps to Watts Calculator Example

To convert Amps (A) to Watts (W), you need to know the voltage (V) and the power factor (PF) of the electrical system. The formula for this conversion is:

Watts (W) = Amps (A) × Voltage (V) × Power Factor (PF)

Here's an example that demonstrates the calculation using a calculator:

Let's assume you have a load with a current draw of 10 Amps (A), a voltage of 220 Volts (V), and a power factor of 0.9:

Watts (W) = 10 A × 220 V × 0.9 PF = 1980 W

Therefore, with a current draw of 10 Amps, a voltage of 220 Volts, and a power factor of 0.9, the power consumption would be approximately 1980 Watts.

Please note that the power factor (PF) represents the efficiency and phase relationship between the voltage and current. It ranges from 0 to 1, and a value close to 1 indicates higher efficiency. Different types of loads have different power factors, and it's important to consider the specific power factor of the load or use an average value if it's unknown. Additionally, this calculation assumes a resistive or non-reactive load. For loads with reactive components, such as those with inductive or capacitive elements, further considerations and calculations are necessary to determine the true power consumption.